When parents in Georgia decide to divorce, it can be good for the overall benefit of the family. However, kids tend to take divorce harshly. Depending on circumstances and the temperament of a child, the reactions may differ, but they largely tend to be negative and full of self-blame.

First and foremost, children are never “too young” to be affected my mental distress or even mental illness such as anxiety, depression, or post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The way these symptoms manifest in children can be different than the signs in adults, so sometimes parents do not spot them easily. Keep an eye on your child for any changed behaviors.

Behaviors also include their interpersonal relationships and how they connect to other individuals. For example, in the stress of post-divorce, a child may suddenly become much more defiant toward authority figures like school teachers. This can lead to behavioral problems that grow worse or more complex with time if not dealt with.

Children also tend to feel guilty over divorces. Many may develop complexes and poor coping mechanisms as a direct result of guilt that is left unaddressed. Guilty children can turn to self-blame in other situations as well, taking on more than their fair share of responsibility even in situations where they are not at fault.

If you are interested in looking into divorce and other matters of family law, consider taking a look at our web page on the same topic. You can learn more about the process itself, as well as how it can affect all members of your family.